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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
of it is also a game of chicken where they both swerve off the road and we do go over the fiscal cliff. there is a big penalty to be paid for it. i think the american people were hoping that both sides would be able to come together. hopefully they will. it's hard to say whether behind the scenes things are better than we think or 0 whether this rile is a titanic battle that is going to be fought out and we're going to go over the cliff. no one knows that for sure yet. jenna: that is the truth. how do you think this sets us up for the year ahead. we have some really big challenges that our don't tree facescountry faces. your thoughts and how big of a role party is in this problem, and in not being able to really get any resolutions, and kick the can down the road. is the party the problem or is it something else? >> i think a lot of it is both parties and problems within both parties. i think a lot of the players that are sitting here already today making these decisions are looking at the 2014 re-election bid, and they are not worried about the other party. their seats are safe for th
bit about the fiscal cliff and that's something we've all been talking about recently, and what it means for us right now and the year ahead. we also have other business news. we'll get back to the president by the way if and when we get that feedback. he will be taking questions from the audience there of business leaders as gregg mentioned. elizabeth mcdonald ever the fox business network is standing by list toning some of what the president had to say about the economy. liz, can you place it in context about where our economy is right now. >> reporter: the president just now was placing it in the -- the economy in the broader context of what is going on in the world, mentioning asia, mentioning europe, and then he turned to what was the most important part of the speech, he started to speak and that is what is holding us back ironically is stuff that is going on in this town, and he also, the president also said, no one wants to get a deal done more than me. so he's trying to essentially give some encouragement to get the fiscal cliff deal talks ignited and going. and so this
. whenever you hear members of congress talk about any kind of fiscal cliff deal you have to approach it with a sort of believe everything and believe nothing attitude. i think that everybody wants to avoid having taxes go up for all americans as of january 1st but everybody has a price for that. and it, to me, it's about whether or not both sides are looking for a win-win deal, meaning, my opponent wins and i win. or whether both sides or one of the sides are looking for a deal where only i win and you lose and on top of all of that then we have to look at what do they want to include in any sort of deal? are we going to address entitlement reform? are we going to cut spending? are we only trying to deal with the tax cut issue? will we try to address the debt ceiling issue? so there are a lot of moving parts here. jon: it seems the campaign promise of the president to raise taxes on couples making over $250,000 a year, it seems like that almost has to come true in some form for the president and the democrats to swallow a deal? >> i think so. i think the president has been committed
to those american citizens, though, that say, listen, over the fiscal cliff, i'm afraid of that, i don't even want to entertain the possibilities of what that would look like. >> i think when it comes to issues such as the extension of unemployment benefits, social security, medicare, freidman would have argued that it's the better course to cut spending in those areas now rather than defer indefinitely on making real spending cuts. the current agreement was hammered out in august of 2011. what typically happens is that spending cuts are promised in the future, but they never materialize, the taxes are raised anyway. that is exactly what would happen under this circumstance, taxes would be raised, spending cuts would be promised in the future but when that deadline is reached we won't make the spending cuts. so at this point in time what is really being talked about is strictly a tax increase and freidman would have opposed that. jenna: i don't need to tell you that, there's certainly been critics of milton freidman out there. if you take the criticism together this is what they say. t
lawmakers have less than a month to reach a deal to avert the fiscal cliff. both sides seem to be digging in for a fight. the white house saying it will not agree to a deal without raising taxes on the wealthiest americans. the gop says they want to see changes made to medicare, medicaid and social security. here is republican senator kelly ayotte of new hampshire. >> i was disappointed by the president's proposal. i think it is essentially a rerun of his budget proposal. i mean the revenue proposals are $1.6 trillion in revenue and tax increases. it is a massive tax increase but also, also not significant and meaningsful entitlement reforms. jon: a piece today in the "wall street journal" says more is at stake than just the fiscal cliff. quote, democratic lawmakers and party strategists say the success of his second term could ride on how this early battle unfolds. if mr. obama can cement a bipartisan deal to his liking many believe his approach to the negotiations could serve as template for tackling major issues that could play out over the next four years. yet for many other democrats
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)